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So what do I need to learn to be a web designer?

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This question gets asked allot, so here are the basic possibilities, they can be mixed and matched to whatever fits you or you plan on doing in the future. All you MUST know is the Base stuff, Scripting languages is normal and Soft languages would be a good idea.

 

[i just whipped this up on the fly, so I expect other things I forgot to be suggested, hence added, so this is not the final list yet.]

 

 

Base Knowledge:

  • HTML (HTML 4.2 now, but HTML 5 will become standard in another year or so, you can code it now if you like. XHTML is only for use with XML based languages like MathML)
  • CSS (CSS3 I guess)
  • XML (This more a data structure than an actual language, but can be useful in web sites)

 

Scripting Languages:

  • JavaScript (most common)
  • Action Script (if you get into Flash)
  • VBScript (Old fashioned)

 

*Soft Web Programming Languages: (Simple Web Sites)

  • PHP (most common)
  • Perl
  • Python (more rare)
  • VisualBasic (Old fashioned)

 

*Hard Programming Languages: (Industrial/Corporate/Commercial web sites)

  • Java
  • C#

 

Technologies:

  • Classic ASP (a structure, not a language. Generally Visual Basic. Not recommended)
  • .NET (Modern ASP & can be used with the above languages, aka PHP.net, C#.net. C# being the current industry standard)
  • Ruby on Rails (becoming more popular)
  • Flash Builder (The program formerly known as Prince Flex. Flash based technology)
  • 'CMS' Content Management System (You need to understand what they do and how they help you and the customer, includes Drupal & WordPress as examples)

 

* I decided to break these up, Soft meaning basic web use. Hard being those languages to create robust Web Applications for more serious development of applications for web or desktop development.

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Killersites.com has roadmaps covering essential technologies:

 

http://killersites.com/roadmaps/web-designer.php

http://killersites.com/roadmaps/web-programmer.php

 

These roadmaps are really intended as a starting point only, so for example the programmer's roadmap focuses primarily on PHP, though there are a lot of other languages that are possible to learn.

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for a web designer knowledge on html,css,php,and languages like .net,jsp are must.good understanding of concepts thoroughly will lead you to build an effective and creative web sites.

Edited by Andrea
Link Deleted - No SPAM, please

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LSW, Thank you for the share!

 

Your list looks more for a web programmer than a web designer.

 

A designer should know industry-wide tools, such as Dreamweaver.

 

So many sites are now being made on WordPress platforms, that it is

becoming easier to create a site. Therefore, many people will develop

web designing skills, and employment will be more difficult.

 

One way around is to either be an entrepreneur or to also learn programming.

Doing jobs via HireACoder and ODesk and the other popular site that slipped my

mind is another option.

 

I read on Dice recently that a portfolio can help you get a job.

So, after learning the basics of a course, do a project, and keep the results.

If you are knowledgeable enough, participate in open source projects.

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For Web designer one must the basic concept of programming language. Starting from the base of programming you have to learn. Also try to learn the OOPS concept. After knowing the concept of OOPS you can learn any of the programming language.

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To be perfect as a web designer, you have to read all about above mentioned things. After that to be master in those field you have to practice more and more in order to be skillful in those platform - start doing small-small designs for the beginning after that try to design complex designs for gaining some confidence within you.

 

For beginning practice, i will suggest you w3schools sites which is a WYSIWYG web design tutorial which is an awesome platform for all newbie web designer to understand basic web design techniques.

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I want know what do I need to be a web designer, too. I know tell me, please. Thanks

 

Read the first post in this thread.

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I modified LSW's list for Web Programmer, since his list is outdated:

 

Core Knowledge:

HTML (HTML 4.2 and HTML5)

JavaScript (note: much more than a scripting language)

CSS (CSS2 and CSS3)

PHP5

WordPress

SQL -- MySQL is fine

basic relational database knowledge

 

Good to Know:

Photoshop

jQuery

JSON

Java

C# on .Net framework

Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, EXCEL, Access, Publisher

 

Can be helpful on your resume:

Ruby on Rails

Python

Dreamweaver (hand coding is easier and creates better code, though)

Facebook -- creating Fan pages

Mobile web site creation

Creating Apps

Using Social Media and tying into web and mobile sites

Basic internet marketing (branding, driving traffic, engaging customers)

Creating Q-codes and using on websites

SMS -- text messaging service set-up (Twilio)and phone/web/mobile use

Creating and using RSS feeds

SharePoint or GoogleDocs -- way to share documentations with others

 

Not Sure, I Think Outdated:

AJAX

Perl (clunky language)

 

Don't bother:

ASP (Active Server Pages)

XML, XHTML -- replaced by HTML5

Another Flash related, such as Action Script and Flash Builder

VBScript -- even IE now uses JavaScript

Drupal -- Use WordPress instead

 

Eh!

Visual Basic -- If learning either C# on .NET or Java is too hard, then learn Visual Basic on .NET as a stepping stone

 

Excellent English speaking, reading, and writing skills are golden.

If you know a foreign language, that can help land a web developer job.

People skills (plays nice with others) and soft skills (attention to detail, for example) are also important.

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Not Sure, I Think Outdated:

AJAX

Just as a quick comment, AJAX is definitely not outdated.

 

Don't bother:

Drupal -- Use WordPress instead

This really depends more on the website owner's needs. I know quite a few people who still use Drupal, and it's still relatively popular as far as I know.

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I modified LSW's list for Web Programmer, since his list is outdated:

First post I have written that has been called outdated after a mere 3 months.

 

  1. The standard is HTML 4.1, there is no 4.2
  2. AJAX is not Outdated
  3. Drupal was an example, but it is a true CMS where Wordpress is not, but can be used as one. Drupal is an enterprise level CMS.
  4. I despise Java, but low an behold, our shop is going pure Java... figures, we were so close to going C#.NET. Unfortunately Java is still the predominant language at enterprise level.
  5. Oracle - There are major differences between Oracle and SQL databases. I think either one will do you as it is likely around 50/50 chance between which you will deal with. (Both use the SQL language however to get data and there are different flavors of the SQL languages)
  6. An understanding of the difference between XML/XHTML and HTML, HTML5 is an HTML languages, so does not be default replace XHTML which is an XML language. XHTML is only used on web sites by those who do not understand the difference. However the future does look bleak for XHTML.
  7. Flash Builder (AKA Flex) is not dead and still valuable for AIR apps, just Flash support is being more or less dropped by Adobe for mobile devices as HTML5 is stated by Adobe as being better.
  8. Keep in mind folks that HTML5 is not a standard yet and will not be before 2014, so it is still and unofficial language at this time.
  9. COBAL: Ancient/early language, but still used in the financial industry, a COBAL programmer can make big bucks, especially in the Middle East. To bad you can't make that money with a spoken language or I would be an expert in Sumerian biggrin.gif

 

 

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Ben,

 

The question is "So, what do I need to learn to be a web designer?" I believe the majority of

one's learning time should be spent on learning current widely used technologies. It does not

make sense to devote time and energy to technology that has already been replaced with newer

and better methodology.

 

A ridiculous example is don't learn Word 2000 or 2003. Learn Word 2010. If a shop is using

Word 2007, you'll be able to figure it out.

 

HTML5 is now here, and even Internet Explorer is getting on board. So, don't waste your time

on XML or XHTML because HTML5 is the new standard (or is about to be).

 

AJAX is an acronym for Asynchronous JavaScript and XML. XML is outdated.

 

Wikipedia says,

 

"With Ajax, web applications can send data to, and retrieve data from, a server asynchronously

(in the background) without interfering with the display and behavior of the existing page. Data can

be retrieved using the XMLHttpRequest object. Despite the name, the use of XML is not required (JSON

is often used instead), and the requests do not need to be asynchronous."

 

The XMLHttpRequest object is by now replaced since XHTML is no longer used in new development.

 

Wikipedia also says you can't use the AJAX approach across domains. AJAX interfaces may increase user

requests to servers,leading to longer response times and hardware needs. The style of programming leads

to complex code that is difficult to maintain, debug, and test.

 

So, maybe you're right about AJAX because you don't need to use the XMLHttpRequest object, or maybe AJAX

isn't worth learning. I don't know. As for myself, for now I'm sticking to learning the other stuff.

 

For new site creation, WordPress can probably do anything Drupal can,

plus there is a lot more support.

 

Sure, you may get a job where you have to maintain a Drupal site or one that uses old technology.

For that kind of situation, I say learn what you need to know when you need to know it.

 

In summary, build on a solid core of knowledge that you will surely need to become a web programmer

(HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, WordPress, SQL (any flavor) and relational database knowledge)-- all

currnt, widely used technology, and don't worry about the rest until you need it.

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On HTML5, XML, XHTML, etc:

According to Wikipedia:

 

On 14 February 2011, the W3C extended the charter of its HTML Working Group with clear milestones for HTML5. In May 2011, the working group advanced HTML5 to "Last Call", an invitation to communities inside and outside W3C to confirm the technical soundness of the specification. The W3C is developing a comprehensive test suite to achieve broad interoperability for the full specification by 2014, which is now the target date for Recommendation.

Article source: http://www.w3.org/2011/02/htmlwg-pr.html

 

You can use <!DOCTYPE HTML> on any modern browser now, and it will work. That's an HTML5 standard.

 

XHTML 2.0 was a working draft, but work on it was abandoned in 2009 in favor of work on HTML5.

XHTML5 is undergoing development as of September 2009, as part of the HTML5 specification.

Quote from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XHTML

 

I don't know where LSW got the "HTML5 is not a standard yet and won't be until 2014" information,

because although it might not "officially" a standard yet, already, much of it is in standard use.

 

Work on extending XHTML has been dropped. Instead, some of XHTML5 will incorporate into HTML5.

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Ohhh, well if Wikipedia says so than it must be correct, they can't post anything that is not true... oops, that last part was a commercial, my bad.

 

(The above is tongue in Cheek, I like the "The Internet can't post anything that is not true" commercial. That said countering 3WC text with Wikipedia is a bit questionable.)

I don't know where LSW got the "HTML5 is not a standard yet and won't be until 2014" information,

because although it might not "officially" a standard yet, already, much of it is in standard use.

 

Work on extending XHTML has been dropped. Instead, some of XHTML5 will incorporate into HTML5.

Hello? You quoted by source when you quoted my post: Article source: http://www.w3.org/20.../htmlwg-pr.html

 

ME: "HTML5 is not a standard yet and won't be until 2014"

 

YOU: "although it might not "officially" a standard yet"

 

Are seem to be agreeing with me that it is not a standard yet? Nowhere does it say you cannot use it, I am saying it is not a standard yet! Yes it will be eventually and yes it is becoming wide spread now, but that dopes not make it the standard.

 

Nor do I disagree that XHTML is on it's way out. Butt XHTML is XML & HTML 5 is HTML and that XML & HTML are two different languages, so I am still not sold on what is being done, you are supposed to serve XHTML as XML, so where would HTML 5 fit in? Granted I have not followed it closely.

 

 

I do hope you do not get these posts in the mail, my first reply was a bit confrontational, however after seeing you post before the above I got a better feel for you and you background and did not see the post as snotty so I have mellowed this one down to be more respectful. I should no better than to post when I am stressed through work. My apologies. mellow.gif

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I had not realized you posted twice in a row...

LSW-- it is COBOL -- COmmon Business-Oriented Language.

I programmed in COBOL for over 10 years, and I live in a great place for IT jobs

(the San Francisco Bay Area), but it is very difficult to obtain a job programming

in COBOL.

 

OK, the spelling is my bad. I will not argue that it is not a common language and has been surpassed. However I do specify that the Financial Industry still uses it, Banks and the like. I say this because both the COBOL programmers I have known came from that industry. Also a few departments for the state of Alaska still use it which is hope I was introduced to the fact it is not as dead a language as I had believed at the time. No arguments here.

 

 

Since Apple is no longer supporting Flash in its devices, Flash is on its deathbed. At least that's my opinion.

 

You got that right with Mac, that really screwed things up for Adobe. They have admitted that HTML 5 will do most of what Flash was created to do as well and they were killing flash support for mobile devices (though I have heard rumors they have changed their mind to some extent). But for desktop Apps, AIR is still viable and out there and is not slated for the grave, hence Flash and Flex. But in no way is Flash anywhere as nearly important as it once was.

 

I love C# (just know the basics, but love the philosophy behind it). Oh well on

"losing out" to Java. At least Java is easy and better than C and C++ (those pointers

and garbage collection!).

 

Here we can share a drink! I learned C & C++ back in 2002, never needed them though, they are admittedly old. I was in a C#.NET & SQL shop for a year, then switched to a Java/Oracle shop just adding Flex to the mix.

 

Then Adobe made their Flex/Flash Builder announcement and our management changed. So Flex and Java were out and we would be migrating to C#.NET and Silverlight, still debating Oracle or SQL Server. Then the new manager decided to retire... we got another new IT Manager (From my old shop) and he scrammed C#.NET (Like our old shop used) and decided to keep Java & Oracle, but switching completely to Oracle tools and technologies and no Flex. Grrrrrrrrr

 

We were not only set, but looking forward to C# and Whammo! Stuck again with Java which I am no fan of. Now we will have to see how the Oracle tools we have to buy work out... I sort of liked Eclipse.

 

But this shop has changed many technologies over the years and usually ones that were not "Sate Standards," so now my life will be learning more Java than I ever wanted to know to re-write apps we use written in M$ Access, Flex, ASP Classic and even Paradox!

 

Since you agree with Ben on AJAX, then I'm probably wrong.

A difference of opinion is not wrong and you make a good argument, especially if you have used it. I have not, but there is still enough people discussing it that I would not personally discount it yet.

 

In the end it depends on where you will work. Even here at the state we have dozens of different technologies in use as each division and/or Departments can choose their own to work with.

 

 

 

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Hi LSW,

Your replies are always so thoughtful. I enjoy reading all your posts. You always make me think.

 

We were both replying to Ben's post at the same time. Great minds... Then I double posted--oops.

 

Agree that HTML5 isn't standard yet; my point was that it is already in such widespread use, so learn it.

Don't know where your 2014 date came from, but the latest actions seem that now it is just a formality

before becoming the "official standard". Don't know much about XML/XHTML, just know learning HTML5 instead

is the way for me to go. I think HTML5 incorporates a lot of XHTML (if not in syntax, then in capability).

 

SQL -- I think once you learn one version, you'll know about 85% of any other main version.

 

When a company is seeking to hire a programmer, I think they prefer a candidate who knows how to

maintain the business's existing applications and can create new ones. So, learning popular core

technologies that have been around a long time and are growing fits the bill. Hence, JavaScript,

HTML current plus HTML5, CSS current plus CSS3, current PHP, and a relational database plus its

flavor of SQL (such as mySQLi)are listed under Core Knowledge in my post.

 

I'm in a race to learn enough to get hired before becoming homeless. So arguments about AJAX and

XML/XHTML are interesting, but my focus remains on learning enough of the core things to get hired.

 

I haven't used AJAX and haven't been in IT for ten years. My background is IBM mainframe programmer.

(My how everything has changed! Motto: keep up.) Be thankful you have a job and the skills and experience to

get another one. I'm thankful for my analytic mind, ability to learn quickly, and killersites.com.

 

Changing gears, some interesting things I watched/read a few hours ago:

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First you need to have good imagination and creativity skills to start with web designing as web designing is an art. Technical knowledge is simply not enough. But yes you need to learn basic HTML, Javascript, PHP, ASP. NET, all this will surely help.There are many content management systems available that handle the coding and everything themselves you just need to have a plan and a clear idea about what kind of website you want to design.

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These days PHP is in trend.I am working on this technology since very long. If you want to establish yourself in this field then PHP is must. You have to start with basic like HTML etc after that you can start other thing as well.

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This question gets asked allot, so here are the basic possibilities, they can be mixed and matched to whatever fits you or you plan on doing in the future. All you MUST know is the Base stuff, Scripting languages is normal and Soft languages would be a good idea.

 

[i just whipped this up on the fly, so I expect other things I forgot to be suggested, hence added, so this is not the final list yet.]

 

 

Base Knowledge:

  • HTML (HTML 4.2 now, but HTML 5 will become standard in another year or so, you can code it now if you like. XHTML is only for use with XML based languages like MathML)
  • CSS (CSS3 I guess)
  • XML (This more a data structure than an actual language, but can be useful in web sites)

 

Scripting Languages:

  • JavaScript (most common)
  • Action Script (if you get into Flash)
  • VBScript (Old fashioned)

 

*Soft Web Programming Languages: (Simple Web Sites)

  • PHP (most common)
  • Perl
  • Python (more rare)
  • VisualBasic (Old fashioned)

 

*Hard Programming Languages: (Industrial/Corporate/Commercial web sites)

  • Java
  • C#

 

Technologies:

  • Classic ASP (a structure, not a language. Generally Visual Basic. Not recommended)
  • .NET (Modern ASP & can be used with the above languages, aka PHP.net, C#.net. C# being the current industry standard)
  • Ruby on Rails (becoming more popular)
  • Flash Builder (The program formerly known as Prince Flex. Flash based technology)
  • 'CMS' Content Management System (You need to understand what they do and how they help you and the customer, includes Drupal & WordPress as examples)

 

* I decided to break these up, Soft meaning basic web use. Hard being those languages to create robust Web Applications for more serious development of applications for web or desktop development.

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Hi Kyle

 

Its the Brit here, hope you are well and your family ?

 

Gents, Kyle was a soldier in Berlin, as I was in the Brit forces in Berlin in the 60s, our trails cossed in the days of MSN communities, LSW as I knew him him then was an inspiration to all those who wanted to set up web sites, he never varied from being a great person who never looked down at us newbies, but just helped us so much, he is a mountain of knowledge

 

Thanks Kyle

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Greetings Everyone,

 

I am here to learn from those who are more experienced in web designing than me. I have recently joined a web design company in USA and I am here to learn and grow as a web designer.

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Every beginners of web design field should keep the recent updates of new Designing tools and their short cut keys in website design and make a great ideas to build a unique style the website.That is the good responsibility for being expert in design field.

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Hello,

 

I have one more suggestion, if you like to know about it. Android is the good one and latest design platform launched by Google. I have used Eclipse as an editor to code.

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Nice.. what a clear explantion you have given here which made most of my points clear. Now I have a question that I want to learn PHP but you said it is used for just simple web applications so shall I switch to learn Java?

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Nice.. what a clear explantion you have given here which made most of my points clear. Now I have a question that I want to learn PHP but you said it is used for just simple web applications so shall I switch to learn Java?

 

PHP can be used for very complex web applications - have you heard of Facebook? That's just one example of a PHP based system. We created StudioWeb with PHP and we do some interesting things in that interactive training application.

 

Java is great (was my primary language for years) but it is really something you should learn if you want to get into the enterprise development game - that's means working for huge corporations.

 

:bash:

 

Otherwise, for server-side programming, stick to PHP or Ruby.

 

Stefan

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