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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/22/2018 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    Hi, With freelancing web developer, chances of liability are very, very little. It's not like someone can trip over your website and break their foot. That said, be sure to have a good standard contract that you use to avoid clients being able to come back at you after the job is done. ... Basically, you need them to sign off and absolve you of further work once complete. I would consult with local accountant though and they should be able to tell you when it makes sense to create an LLC. LLC's are more expensive to setup than a sole proprietorship and the accounting cost are higher. Where I am in Canada, setting up a corporation makes sense when you are making more than $60k profit ... mainly for tax reasons. ... A local accountant should tell you how that figures where you are.
  2. 2 points
    I have not looked at Studio Web for Python... but yea, Stef does good work. I checked it out when he first started it. Besides all languages are common, so knowing one will help learning others as you see the common elements.
  3. 1 point
    Hello All, It would be great to see who's kicking around the forums and get some introductions going. Seems like a good way to get things rolling Starting with myself... I'm Tyler. I'm in Vancouver BC Canada and I'm currently working as a freelance web designer and marketer, mostly with local businesses. Everything I have learned so far has been on a need to nerd basis (as Stef would say). I still have a lot to learn, but I get by ok. On any given day I might be working on web development, design, seo, ppc campaigns, content marketing, or anything really. I love it all, but have considered whether or not I should be more narrowly focused. We'll see! I also do some affiliate marketing and have built and flipped a few sites of my own. I stumbled onto Stef's youtube a few months ago and became an instant fan, some of his vlogs on business, contracts, and clients have been very helpful. So when he announced that he was re-launching the forum, I was like: I have a feeling this will be a great community. With that said, who else is out there? Introduce yourself...
  4. 1 point
    Just an article that I thought some of you may find useful speeding up your wi-fi networks. 5 things that will slow your Wi-Fi network by NetworkWorls Magazine https://www.networkworld.com/article/3256026/lan-wan/5-things-that-will-slow-your-wi-fi-network.html
  5. 1 point
    Web Developers, much of my posting to date has covered protecting yourself. Lets talk about protecting your customer and their users. I cannot state this any stronger, Strong Passwords! If it takes little effort to break a password than the site you built can be hi-jacked to pass out malware. Database design, consider making it a tiered design. Sensitive data in a red zone, encrypted and password protected with strict access permissions. Less sensitive data in a Yellow zone that has lesser protection and more access and simple stuff in a green zone with just password protection and general permissions. If you use look-up tables that state that "2 = married with children", that is a look-up table and needs liuttle protection. But all sensitive data should be encrypted so that if adversaries do get to it... they can't read it. Be aware of SQL Injection attacks. If you allow data to be added to a website, make sure it is checked. If you allow basic comments with no security, an adversary could insert JavaScript into that comment that does really bad things. Malware Detection - Discovering Cross-Site Scripting Attacks Watering Hole Attacks. I think LastLine blog defined it rather well: "In a network watering hole attack, cybercriminals set traps in websites that their target victims are known to frequent. Often the booby-trapped websites are smaller, niche sites that tend to have limited security. These sites can include business partner sites or small websites that provide specific products, services, or information to the target company or industry. When visited, the compromised website infects the target end-users computer or device with keyloggers, ransomware, and other types of malware." The issue here is really about protecting web sites you build from being the water holes that infects your customers users. Network Security and Watering Hole Attacks As I come across tips for securing your web sites, I will expand this thread.
  6. 1 point
    Top web browsers 2018: Microsoft's IE and Edge shed share as Chrome gains https://www.computerworld.com/article/3199425/web-browsers/top-web-browsers-2018-microsofts-ie-and-edge-shed-share-as-chrome-gains.html
  7. 1 point
    I've built sites using Divi and other such builders, and it is possible to customize sites built on those platforms. Depending on your needs, you'll likely find that you will need to make styling or layout adjustments. No site builder is perfect and you likely won't find something that matches 100% with what you want to do. Most site builders have specific APIs or expectations for how changes are made. At least in my experience, even if you use a site builder plugin, it's rare that you won't have to code anything at all. The downside with site builders is that they often try to do too much -- they try to be the solution to every possible problem, and it results in sites that are over-engineered and slow to download. You'll potentially wind up with a site that only uses 20% of the theme builder's functionality, but 100% of all the downsides. I generally prefer to custom build my sites, using the Advanced Custom Fields plugin to provide the editing interface for the various content blocks that make up the site. In general, you won't be able to export out the code that these Wordpress-based site builders generate -- they rely on Wordpress and Wordpress' editing interface in order to work. I suppose you could manually download each page as HTML and piece the file structure together, but that's a significant amount of work and you'll lose the ability to easily edit the content or change functionality.
  8. 1 point
    Yes got resolved in subsequent videos. Thanks
  9. 1 point
    glad I read this post, now I know I just have to wait a couple more hour and until you do todays orders..... Merci..
  10. 1 point
    Thank you so much for responding, the book, youtube vids and everything .. you are the man
  11. 1 point
    When I try to access http://projects.studioweb.com/dashboard (from the email I received when my account was activated), I get "Whoops, looks like something went wrong." I don't see anything else on the forum, so am I missing something? https://cloud.studioweb.com/ works fine Thanks! -Warren
  12. 1 point
    There are few ways to handle this. First rule, you can't apply two IDs to a tag. IDs have to be unique. So I would use one ID to apply all your CSS to the tag in question. Or a class if you plan on using the CSS rules more than once in a page.
  13. 1 point
    Hi, aquaturtles.com I think is now offline. You don't really need it. I would simply get your own hosting ... you can get it for a little as $2/month. You can try these guys: https://funio.com/en/?utm_source=killer-sites&utm_medium=display&utm_campaign=banner1
  14. 1 point
    Switched it up and had hot Chai Tea
  15. 1 point
    OH!!!!! I got it. Down in the lower right-hand side of the display, it said "plain text". You have to change it to HTML. Dar!!!!!!! Works great now! -Mike
  16. 1 point
    Hi, 1. Well, just start asking around. Check local job ads on sites like indeed.com. That said, $99 isn't a huge investment in the grand scheme of things ... and since it is on sale, it's hard to go wrong. 2. Courses are updated as they need to be. I just updated the SQL course coincidentally. Stef
  17. 1 point
    Hi, For HTML, CSS and JavaScript, the web browsers 'know' what to do because the code has a particular structure that tells the web browser what kind of code it is. For example, with HTML, the tag structure with the angled brackets tell the browser it is HTML. For CSS, it can see CSS with the style attribute or the CSS tag block. With JavaScript, it is the script tag block. With PHP, you have to create a PHP page (ex: index.php) ... and when the web server see's the PHP extension, it passes the page to the PHP engine, and it knows how to find and read the PHP code. Makes sense? Stef
  18. 1 point
    Hi everyone, I'm Mike. I tried to post a reply yesterday, but I kept getting an error saying that I was forbidden to post. Anyway, I'm a retired electronic/telecommunications technician, who has always, as Stef would put it so aptly, a need to nerd. I got into programming before computers were even out, around 1978/1979. Someone offered to sell me a programmable calculator, a TI-56. I had no idea, at the time what a programmable calculator was, but, once I caught onto it. My first computer was a VIC-20, and, I programmed that, saving my programs to audio tape. I got away from electronics for a few years, until my last job sent me a Raspberry Pi to upgrade a Bose audio unit. I started reading up on the Raspberry Pi and it got me interested in electronics/programming once again. And, Stef's videos have inspired me to put more effort into reading up on programming and coding. For the last four weeks, I've spent at least four hours a day either reading or coding. I'm well into Stef's HTML 2015 course. Once I've completed my Linux material, my C++ material and my GTK+ coding, I'll have more time to complete Stef's course. Stef, I know you like to close out your videos saying, "I hope this helps." Believe me, anyone who shares as much as you have helps everyone. Good work. -Mike
  19. 1 point
    Your folder CSS is capitalized, but in your path you use lower case css. Files are case sensitive. Best to pick lowercase and always stick with it.
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    Hi, Send me an email and I will arrange to get you the quizzing. Stef
  22. 1 point
    Darn, and I've had my Flash 4 Bible on my shelf for all those years knowing the day would come that I would find time to read it..... Just another great example of why sometimes, procrastination does pay off............
  23. 1 point
    From my perspective, figure out what you are worth. If you believe that your time is worth $20 an hour before all expenses then that's where you can start. Next determine what it cost you to be able to perform your job such as home office space, computers, software, etc. You would then need to figure out the average of that cost. For instant, a computer might cost you $2000 and is in service for 3 years. Based on 2000 work hours per year, that would be roughly about 33 cents per hour over the course of 3 years. Same thing for home office, software and anything else you use such as printer, supplies, phone/cell, etc. Also, keep in mind administrative time. Although you don't bill them directly for such service you need to factor that into your cost. You can do the same thing with domain and hosting but I usually keep those separate since most client wants to know the cost of hosting and such. Hypothetically, you may need to charge $30 per hour in order to satisfy the fact that you are making $20 per hour after all expenses. Finally, if you charge a fixed rate job then you need factor in approximately how many hours it would normally takes you to build a site and then times that by your rate. If it takes you 10 hours to build a site then it would be 10 hours X $30 = $300. This is not something written in stone but it will give you a general idea how to determine your cost.
  24. 1 point
    Hi! If you did not get your validation email, just email me directly at: stefan@killersites.com ... And I will update your account so you can use the forum. PS: remember to include your forum user ID. Thanks, Stefan
  25. 1 point
    Before I start I want to explain that this may sound like a self centered rant all about myself but if you will bear with it you will find it does have a point in fact. I went through web design school in 1999-2000, I got out of school three months after the "Dot Com Crash" flooded the market with experienced designers now unemployed. I never did get a really serious job. What I did was struggle with Freelance design to get a portfolio (which has now shrunk to 5 sites, two of which are mine as one after the other went offline for one reason or another) and I did so with no connections or friends to bounce ideas and techniques with. Now I can say that my schooling was not the best. We learned to do nothing more with CSS then replace tags, it was in fact a mere 2 hour class in that time. I was taught that HTML was dead and XHTML had replaced it and that XHTML is simply HTML that works with XML. We also no how wrong that is. This lead for me to what I consider "Stagnation." That is what is what I did, I stagnated. I kept the level of knowledge that I had and went no further, I merely did the same things wrong as I was taught for 3 years because it was taught that way and the school must know what they were doing. About 2003 I landed the job of creating a web portal for my District's Youth Services (I was living in Berlin Germany at the time) and this needed to be accessible (I thought I knew what that meant back then) according to the German BITV laws. Well this was a big deal and trying to figure out how to do it with tables I came across two articles and a old Bookmarks file. The articles were from Gez Lemon (Juicey Studios) & Patrick "Redux" Lauke and both pointed to a web site named Accessif.com and it's Forum. The Bookmarks were mine and I discovered a site called Killersites that I had been to a few times based on the book of a big name designer. Killersites Well Killersites had changed, a new fellow was running in named Stefan and it now had a forum. So I joined it and quickly was linked further to a web site named CSSZenGarden - my Jaw hit the floor! CSS can do that? I still do not know if my school was so bad or at that time CSS support was just so poor, but it opened a new world to me and I jumped in feet first. Stef and David Mead were a great help in those early days. David has since dropped off Killersites due to spending time with his fairly new child but stops by once in a while. Accessibility did not exist on KS, but as I became more proficient I brought it up more and more and Stef supported me and was open minded to changing his ideas of web design and I finally became a moderator here ...ok, the fact I was in Germany and online when he was offline likely helped to *grin*. not only did I learn allothere about web design but having to then find ways to describe these new ideas to other regulars and new members helped me focus and consider options for arguments and teaching web design and accessibility here taught me as much as anything. Now I find members such as Im, Tpatterson, Thelma, Billy and many more who came here with either no experience or limited experience with accessibility and such now answering the same questions they used to ask and many more pointing out accessibility issues and the likes. I see my answerers online before I even have a chance. This is not because I am a super designer or teacher, it is because these people were open to new ideas and counter points to what the believed when they came here. They have reached the point they are now at, being respected by newbies they help because they were willing to listen to some unknown guy named LSW with just as much or maybe less years in the business as they themselves had. But in the end, they are now where they are because they got involved in a forum where they had contact with Stef, David, myself and each other.Because they had a place they enjoyed where new ideas and old myths were discussed among experts and beginners and all as equals. It is Forums that brought us where we are today. Accessify I walked into Accessify Forum thinking I knew what I was talking about ... whoa was I wrong. I did not know beans about accessibility in the real world. That was quickly pointed out to me and once I toned down my postings and began asking more, those in the group accepted me and I have learned from some of the best in the business including but not limited to Joe Clark , Patrick "Redux" Lauke, Isofarrow, Malarkey, Tommy "Toolman" Olsson, Brother Cake, Gez Lemon, Diva, Nigel Peck, Molly Holzschlag, ... also contact with people who work with and/or represent the W3C, RNIB and many others like Universities. The vast majority being from Europe and giving me another way of looking at the web. I even today read more than I answer as people there are far above me in the learning curve. This time I started and remained a beginner in may ways and as a user and not admin or moderator can say that it is also invaluable as a resource, Many of the best links I share at Killersites come from threads at Accessify. Although it like every other forum is about learning, it tends to be more discussion oriented with points and counter points as accessibility is not a s clear cut as HTML and CSS. It is harder to answer with yes and no answers as at KS. So their is more discussion about peoples views and understandings of guidelines and real life real time discussions about what works and what does not. The best blogs out there post here quite often before going live to get feedback from other big names. Accessify Forum put me in contact with the Guild of Accessible Web Designers (GAWDS) who's membership I joined and discovered (members web sites are first examined to ensure that they truly understand or support accessibility) that my "Accessible web site" had more barriers then you could shake a stick at and that I did not know the first thing about accessibility. But Mel Pedley of Blackwidow Designs not only pointed out my failings but how to fix them and with her help the LSW of that time became accessible and I was accepted as a member. I still find myself slapping my forehead over there when I discover some accessibility consideration so logical I should have seen it myself ...so I am still learning today. As above, the acceptance of the regulars and in this case industry leaders and their patience mean that once again a Forum opened up new worlds for me and "brainstorming with the best" has boosted my knowledge in these last 3 years far beyond the first year and I have learned more then I ever did in school. Other forums There are other forums out there, each with a specialty, SitePoint is a great general forum with more knowledge in the direction of programming and business oriented things. Computer Arts Forum gets more into the artistic and software oriented with allot of 3D, Flash and artistic subjects. I just dropped out of actively going to these forums as they are very big and somewhat hard to deal with as well as the move, real life and more duties at killersites. It does not reflect on their usefulness, simply on lack of time to spend there. It does not matter what forum you join, the point is that forums are a must for web designers just to keep your creativity charged and keep you up to date on recent changes in the industry. Whether you are a beginner or advanced, learning or teaching does not matter, it is the participation that matters that keeps you at your best for your customers and helper or "helpee" you will find your self learning and improving either way. Projects Although not directly related to forums, face it, you can read tutorials, blogs, books or forums and it does no good if you cannot turn around and put it in use now or later. Bookmarks are a must! Bookmark everything! And do so logically and under different labels so you can find it again when you need it! So projects are a must, private or customer, actual or make believe ... you need projects to support you in the forums. Like I say above, my knowledge has multiplied beyond belief since joining KS and accessify. Here I made the jump in a short amount of time between beginner and now the expert here for accessibility. All because I had projects that challenged me and required things I have never done before. But since my contract with the portal ended I have had no real challenges and although I spend allot oftime at KS some may have noticed that I am not so vocal, I help less then before, I basically chase Spam. It has become somewhat boring as the challenge is gone, I learn little new and we have a flock of regulars now faster with the same answers then me. I find myself once more in a slump, once more stagnating. I am now finishing up on a re-code of my Host's site, it was harder than expected but the only real challenge was working with Data Tables. But again i turned to the forums to get help, advice and see what I have missed never having done serious data tables before and for a short time it was fun again. So i will likely write another post on the correct creation of accessible data tables. So that is my rant, maybe self centered but I enjoy seeing Thelma and Susie now helping others as David and Stef likely feel about me having seen me improve here. It is easy to get caught up in the web and forget your real life, I see that every time my daughter wants to play and I say no. But just burying yourself in projects or real life can be the death of a designer as well. If it is even just one, choose a forum you like and hit it regularly, at least once a week for a few hours just to help and see what is changing as it is changing to keep from stagnating. If you have no time for forums then try at least a news mail list or a few important blogs, preferably allowing comments. Stagnation is death in this field.
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