Jump to content
Killersites Community

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'python'.

More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


  • Entrepreneurship, Business and Marketing
    • Course: Business Battle Plan
    • Social Media Marketing & Web Marketing
    • Entrepreneurship
  • Community Lounge and FAQ
    • Open Forum
    • New Members Forum - Start Here!
    • Forum Rules and Etiquette
    • Killersites Announcements
  • Web Design
    • Beginners Web Design
    • CSS
    • Advanced Web Design
    • Business of Web Design
    • Web Design News
  • Software
    • StudioWeb
    • Dreamweaver
    • Photoshop
    • Miscellaneous Software
  • Programming
    • Python
    • Javascript
    • PHP
    • General Programming
    • Beginners Ruby
  • Miscellaneous
    • Cybersecurity
    • Blogs and CMS
    • Web Accessibility
    • Peer-to-Peer Reviews
    • Website Templates
    • Web Design Jobs
  • Archives
    • Beginners Web Design
    • Web Accessibility
    • CSS
    • Flash
    • ASP
    • Expression Web
    • Killersites University
    • Actionscript


  • Community Calendar


  • Web Templates
  • PHP Script Bank
  • Javascript Script Bank
  • Web Design Documents and Contracts

Found 7 results

  1. I just wondered if Stef or other had general thoughts on career paths for Linux enthusiasts learning to code. If I wound up doing something for Web Development, I tend to find the idea of doing more backend stuff more interesting. As for Linux, I just find it to be a work environment that I like. I'm not be any means an expert on BASH, but with Google I've been able to refresh myself on syntax if I think I can do something faster with a quick script like appending a line to all files in a directory. I also like all the options Linux has for distributions and desktop and quick access to software with package managers.
  2. Dabbling in Python with Turtle

    I started Stef's KillerPython as a programming refresher and to clarify some things in Python. I like this tool Turtle that he chose to explain things. It's less complicated than other tutorials I've seen trying to use TKinter or even worse PyGame. In the attached code, I have functions for drawing a square or triangle making use of For Loops and If Then statements. The first argument controls the size of the shapes. I wanted a way to accept a second argument telling the Turtle to draw the shape to the left or the right, but I seemed to be getting into a weird situation trying to get Words or Strings accepted as arguments. I defined right = 1 and left = 2 so they sort of behaved like integers in my IF statement. Anyway, so far I'm enjoying the approach to KillerPython. As I said in a post on YouTube, I've had some coding classes that leaned heavily on Power Point and were so awfully boring lol. This is much better feeling more casual and interactive. Testing.py
  3. Hi everyone, I've been doing the Studio Web courses for the past 4 months (HTML, CSS, javaScript and now Python) and I love them, they're great! I'm now in Chapter 7 of the Python course and in part 4 Stef mentions that we have previously seen the tkinter module when learning to draw with Python. I have reviewed all my notes as well as the drawing with Python chapter but I can't seem to find any previous materials on tkinter, is there anything that I'm missing? I think he briefly mentioned tkinter in the treasure hunt chapter (again, saying we had previously seen it) and I remember already thinking that I had never heard of it before. Has there been perhaps some sort of update in the videos? Thanks in advance for any help!
  4. Here is something fun I did messing with my computer with the low level of experience and knowledge that I have. I have had some experience with python before, but I never built anything cool with it. I had several years of not doing anything with it so I decided to start from the beginning again. This little bit of code is basically my own personal "Hello World" program: x = [some number] while x > -1: print(x) x -= 1 The first time I encountered a "Hello World" program it took me a while to understand why it was special. It seemed like I had done more work than the computer had and I didn't value what was going on. But when I first encountered a loop and could command my machine to do actual work; that seemed cool and interesting to me. My first encounter with a loop really fired up my imagination about the power of what I was learning. Below is a little adaptation of the code above which accepts a number defined by the user then counts down. An easy improvement would be some error handling but I was just building it to see what it would do to my machine. I recently was able to research and build my own machine. It isn't top of the line by any stretch, but it is far better than the old 2007 dell machine I had been using before. I still need to do some work to get the ram working up to specifications, and maybe try a mild over-clock but I have that on the back-burner for now. You may notice by the layout I am running a Linux distro. I am running a duel boot Ubuntu and Windows on my machine. I boot into Ubuntu for learning and work. I only have Windows to play games with really. This first screen is the "at rest" version which really isn't at full rest because I have Spotify and a few mild programs running still, but it is close enough for my purposes. I think the network spikes are due to Spotify reaching out to the web for adds and music. You can see the code in the file I am using on the bottom left. The top left is the terminal I am using to run the program. You can see I already ran a few mild tests.
  5. Can't find the Quiz

    Hi Stef, I just purchased your class on Python. At the end of chapter 7 Variables and Floats, you mention "now on to the quiz". I when to next video no quiz, where are they stored? Felix
  6. Reading and Opening Files with Python 3

    From my Python 3 course:
  7. Studioweb's Powerful Python 3!

    Hi, I just wanted to announce that StudioWeb's new Python course will be available for spring 2017! Check out Powerful Python 3. Thanks! Stefan