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bsmbahamas

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Posts posted by bsmbahamas


  1. and like my favorite mentor Brian Tracy is so found of repeating...

     

    "No one is better than you and no one is smarter than you. People are just smarter or better in different areas at different times."

     

    case in point, I know how to airbrush a persons finger nails using stencils, but my wife who is a trained nail technician would run cirles around me all day long, and i can make pancakes 20 times better than most people. lol.


  2. you can kind of think of external css files like a functions.php file where you store everything with unique names and then you can call any of those functions from any page that links to that external file.

     

    so if you declare .success { border: 1px solid green; font-color: green; } then you can simply add the class

    .success to any element that should have that green border and green text, make another called .error with a red border and red fonts and use can use that on elements that display errors - and you don't have to keep re-writing the same css over and over you just add class='success' or class='error' to the elements.

     

    i'd also hasten to add that id are unique and should only be added to one element per page, but classes can be added to many elements on the same page. when i first started out i didn't know the difference and would use the same id multiple times on the same page(because css does not tell you when you make a mistake liek javascript or php does, lmao)


  3. i really liked this post.

     

    personally i don't use hacks or conditionals but then again i don't have to support IE,

    and when i do, i stick to a subset of css that i already know works well in all the major

    browsers including IE.

     

    if i really had to though as you suggest, i'd use an include file, and if need be

    just wrap it in an if( file_exists('file-name.php) ){ include 'file-name.php'; },

    so i could simply delete the include file later and the site would just ignore the

    call to include().

    • Upvote 1

  4. and of course the main advantage of Wordpress (besides above mentioned) I think is the possibility of having very own template for practically each page ( or post) and the easiness of achieving that.

     

    i think i understand how to set the static page, add new pages, and link to the regular blog page, but how do you prevent your clients from screwing up your templates?

     

    are you able to designate which parts of the page they are allowed to edit? or are they only allowed to add/remove posts

    while you deal with the actual pages?

     

    i think it is possible to show only posts from certain categories on particular pages, so you could make templates for each page and just let them add/remove posts that will only appear on specific pages.

     

    how do you allow them to do updates while not messing up the page templates, or are they restricted to just blog entries


  5. you can populate a drop down menu with the player names from your database, and add a submit button next to the drop down menu, once they click the submit button it would reload the page and pass the player name in a variable to your script so it would know what info to load.

     

    you'd need the javascript onchange event, or you can add it directly to the drop down box by adding onlick="javascript or function goes here" try these...

     

    http://lab.artlung.com/dropdown/

    http://www.javascriptkit.com/jsref/select.shtml

    http://www.faqs.org/docs/htmltut/forms/_SELECT_onChange.html

     

    if you don't want the page to reload, then you'd need to use 'ajax' which is a combo

    of html, css, javascript and using the DOM, i haven't quite wrapped my head around ajax and mysql yet though, but i have about 10 years experience with html,javascript, and php.


  6. I don't use any special plugins nor do I modify the back end. You can use WordPress as is. Here's an example of a site using WordPress as a CMS that I just launched last week: http://tinyurl.com/yksu4lt .

     

    Have you ever looked at the dashboard of WP? If not' date=' maybe you could sign up for a free wordpress.com account just to get your feet wet. Either that or you could install the default on your own server somewhere.

     

    To make it act like a CMS, just go to Settings > Reading > and then select a "static" page to be your front page. Then select whichever page you want to hold your blog. Of course, these pages should be created first before you can set them in the Reading settings.

     

    So, on the site that I linked above, the front page is set to "Welcome to .... " and the blog page is set to "Blog".

     

    To edit or add static pages, you would go to Pages > Edit or Add New. These would be like the regular pages of a website.

     

    To edit or add blog posts, you would go to Posts > Edit or Add New.[/quote']

     

    So clients are only able to edit the "blog" page? Everything else is static?

     

    wow this site is very neatly done, so you make a regular post add some bells and whistles and set it as the home i.e. static page and then link over to the main blog that looks like a regular bunch of entries huh. pretty slick. i shall have to try this out asap.


  7. great info, never thought of just adding lots of pages.

     

    i highly recommend 'wordpress from scratch' from inside killersites.com/university to allow you to make your own theme/template literally using plain old notepad, modify someone else theme can get very hairy.

     

    cheers.


  8. I'm new to this forum but been lurking for a while. what you say makes a lot of sense. i just built a site for a client and did exactly what you say not to do, worse i added the same css code to each page even though i know i should link to it via a single file.

     

    what you said about using id's instead of classes is genius, so i shall have to fix that too, lol. thanks for the great tip, i never could really tell which was better to use. but now i know.

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