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  1. 2 points
    Hi, With freelancing web developer, chances of liability are very, very little. It's not like someone can trip over your website and break their foot. That said, be sure to have a good standard contract that you use to avoid clients being able to come back at you after the job is done. ... Basically, you need them to sign off and absolve you of further work once complete. I would consult with local accountant though and they should be able to tell you when it makes sense to create an LLC. LLC's are more expensive to setup than a sole proprietorship and the accounting cost are higher. Where I am in Canada, setting up a corporation makes sense when you are making more than $60k profit ... mainly for tax reasons. ... A local accountant should tell you how that figures where you are.
  2. 2 points
    I have not looked at Studio Web for Python... but yea, Stef does good work. I checked it out when he first started it. Besides all languages are common, so knowing one will help learning others as you see the common elements.
  3. 2 points
    Just super backedup with work ... activating schools. Going to circle around to add more to the Business Battle Plan by next week. I plan on outputting all the mp3 files as well. Stef
  4. 1 point
    Web Developers, much of my posting to date has covered protecting yourself. Lets talk about protecting your customer and their users. I cannot state this any stronger, Strong Passwords! If it takes little effort to break a password than the site you built can be hi-jacked to pass out malware. Database design, consider making it a tiered design. Sensitive data in a red zone, encrypted and password protected with strict access permissions. Less sensitive data in a Yellow zone that has lesser protection and more access and simple stuff in a green zone with just password protection and general permissions. If you use look-up tables that state that "2 = married with children", that is a look-up table and needs liuttle protection. But all sensitive data should be encrypted so that if adversaries do get to it... they can't read it. Be aware of SQL Injection attacks. If you allow data to be added to a website, make sure it is checked. If you allow basic comments with no security, an adversary could insert JavaScript into that comment that does really bad things. Malware Detection - Discovering Cross-Site Scripting Attacks Watering Hole Attacks. I think LastLine blog defined it rather well: "In a network watering hole attack, cybercriminals set traps in websites that their target victims are known to frequent. Often the booby-trapped websites are smaller, niche sites that tend to have limited security. These sites can include business partner sites or small websites that provide specific products, services, or information to the target company or industry. When visited, the compromised website infects the target end-users computer or device with keyloggers, ransomware, and other types of malware." The issue here is really about protecting web sites you build from being the water holes that infects your customers users. Network Security and Watering Hole Attacks As I come across tips for securing your web sites, I will expand this thread.
  5. 1 point
    So, is Facebook advertising worth the money? More and more evidence is saying nope! If you are thinking of advertising on Facebook, you may want to check out this amazing video:
  6. 1 point
    Well I finally figured it out I know all through the course Stefan had stressed time and time again about the importance of spaces in Python and I did believe him I just hadn't really learnt the lesson very well until now. So I was determined not to be beaten by this problem with my code, but no matter how many times I looked at my code and compared it to the source code I just couldn't see my fault. Not wanting to move onto the next lesson without fixing my code I decided I'd have to keep checking and re checking until I found my mistake. There it was as plain as day........ SPACING! how could I miss that?? Well I'm not entirely sure how I missed it, but I'm glad i did, I've learnt a very valuable lesson today For comparisons sake heres my newly spaced code: # Python treasure hunt game import random, time def display_game_intro(): print(''' ---->Welcome to the 'Python Treasure Hunt Game' ...the most amazing game ever made! After a long journey, you find yourself in front of two caves. One cave leads to a treasure, the other, a spike filled pit! Being brave, and a little greedy for treasure, you've decided to go for it! ''') def choose_cave(): cave = '' while cave != '1' and cave != '2': print('Which cave do you want to enter? (1 or 2)') cave = input() return cave def enter_cave(chosen_cave): print('\nYou have entered a cave...') time.sleep(1) random_cave = random.randint(1,2) #print("random_cave= " + str(random_cave)) if random_cave == int(chosen_cave): print("---> Lucky you! You found the chest!") else: print("--->You expected to find a chest\n ...and all you found was DEATH!") def main_loop(): ''' The main_loop() function controls the flow of the game by calling functions and using conditionals''' playGameAgain = "yes" while playGameAgain == "yes" or playGameAgain == "y": display_game_intro() chosen_cave = choose_cave() enter_cave(chosen_cave) print("\n\nDo you want to try again? (yes or no)") playGameAgain = input() print("You said: " + playGameAgain) time.sleep(1) if playGameAgain == "yes" or playGameAgain == "y": print("\nLet's try again!") else: print("\nOk, see ya later!") main_loop()
  7. 1 point
    Thank you so much for responding, the book, youtube vids and everything .. you are the man
  8. 1 point
    Check out PhoneGap if you want to create an actual app. But more likely than not, just make the PHP page responsive and you should be fine for mobile. Stef
  9. 1 point
  10. 1 point
    Hi, I am in now. Completed 4 chapters so far and going..
  11. 1 point
    Just keep going. Do the quizzing and write code. It will stick with you more and more as you go. Stef
  12. 1 point
    Hi, For HTML, CSS and JavaScript, the web browsers 'know' what to do because the code has a particular structure that tells the web browser what kind of code it is. For example, with HTML, the tag structure with the angled brackets tell the browser it is HTML. For CSS, it can see CSS with the style attribute or the CSS tag block. With JavaScript, it is the script tag block. With PHP, you have to create a PHP page (ex: index.php) ... and when the web server see's the PHP extension, it passes the page to the PHP engine, and it knows how to find and read the PHP code. Makes sense? Stef
  13. 1 point
    Sure. Send me an email with your purchase email address, I can arrange download of the videos. Stef
  14. 1 point
    Although I consider Pi a Trump stooge for his actions destroying Net Neutrality, nice to see he is none simply a "Yes Man." He is at least picking the right side of this fight in my opinion. Of course this does not Verizon in any way like the Net Neutrality decision. FCC Head and Wireless Lobby Oppose U.S. Bid to Build a 5G Network https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-01-29/u-s-is-said-to-consider-building-5g-network-amid-china-concerns
  15. 1 point
    Sorry for the long delay. I get soooo many questions. For me, being about to develop apps was a valuable skill that just gave me more options. I look at coding as one of many: Writing Coding Communication Etc .... How to motivate yourself: Start learning ... say for example, do 20 minutes / day. StudioWeb will be ideal for you, since you can just do 2 video lessons a day, and their questions. This is all tracked and so you never have to figure out where you were. Continue to do you daily training .... like doing a daily exercise. It's only 20 minutes ... and you don't need to shower after! Start looking around for ideas on things you might build. Ask some business owners you know what kind of software they may need, or maybe a small business may need a website. Get a feel for what is out there. Hope that helps! Stef
  16. 1 point
    Hi! The HTML is rendering in reverse order because of something to do with the innerHTML is being used. Can you post the HTML code?
  17. 1 point
    The while loop takes care of that. So you could read it like so: While the 'mysqli_fetch_assoc' has records, keep looping. When it runs out, stop. Stef
  18. 1 point
    Oh, that's fantastic! It's working better now. That is basically what I was doing but had it in the wrong place and a slightly different hook. Thanks so much. I just need to work with the styling. Thanks so much
  19. 1 point
    I found this link, https://briangardner.com/add-widget-area-site-header/ maybe it will help. But I have a question, how it this section created, if it's a slider you could add the text without an extra sidebar
  20. 1 point
    Ok --- testing worked, I tried to thank Anadar for the excellent recommendation, and it somehow caused a disturbance in the force..... got
  21. 1 point
    Slowly but surely! Thanks for your support.
  22. 1 point
    Greetings, everyone! I've never interacted with the community surrounding Stefan's work, but when I heard a new forum had been developed I thought it would be a great time to get involved! A little bit about myself: My name is Logan. I'm a 24 year old from Hot Springs, Arkansas; a small town in the southern region of the US. Right now I'm working in marketing and sales for local business, but I'm obsessed with business and innovation. Creating real value for people is what gets me out of bed every morning! Although I've taken some of Stef's courses and self-learned a bit of programming, I am no authority on the subject. I feel like I know just enough to understand how everything works. However, I find topics of modern tech implementation pretty exciting and I look forward to listening what everyone has to share. If I'm not a programming wiz, what the heck and I doing here? I'm not sure yet! Haha. I'd like to see how the forum evolves as the community grows. It would be fun to riff about business, finance, or anything else that may spark an interest. I think this will be a neat place to learn and share information! Chao!
  23. 1 point
    Now I have had a a wonderful article pointed out to me about "Help Vampires." Quickly, Help Vampires are those individuals who join forums, then suck the life out of them by asking the same old tired questions, asking not to learn to do something - but to have it simply handed to them, or those who ask the impossible questions like "How do you make a Forum?" (M$N Groups are infested beyong help I think) The following is a excerpt from the article describing what a Help Vamire is: - Does he ask the same, tired questions others ask (at a rate of once or more per minute)? - Does he clearly lack the ability or inclination to ask the almighty Google? - Does he refuse to take the time to ask coherent, specific questions? - Does he think helping him must be the high point of your day? - Does he get offensive, as if you need to prove to him why he should use certain technologies? - Is he obviously just waiting for some poor, well-intentioned person to do all his thinking for him? - Can you tell he really isn't interested in having his question answered, so much as getting someone else to do his work? Now we at Killersites are lucky and get rather few Help Vampires here, but that may change. So I would ask all of you to please read this. This way we can identify Help Vampires and support their return to real forum users. Or so that you can identify yourself as a Help Vampire and Seek help joining the rest of us. So enjoy (I quite enjoyed reading this) and lets all make this a Vampire free zone. The Help Vampire: A Spotter's Guide
  24. 1 point
    Before I start I want to explain that this may sound like a self centered rant all about myself but if you will bear with it you will find it does have a point in fact. I went through web design school in 1999-2000, I got out of school three months after the "Dot Com Crash" flooded the market with experienced designers now unemployed. I never did get a really serious job. What I did was struggle with Freelance design to get a portfolio (which has now shrunk to 5 sites, two of which are mine as one after the other went offline for one reason or another) and I did so with no connections or friends to bounce ideas and techniques with. Now I can say that my schooling was not the best. We learned to do nothing more with CSS then replace tags, it was in fact a mere 2 hour class in that time. I was taught that HTML was dead and XHTML had replaced it and that XHTML is simply HTML that works with XML. We also no how wrong that is. This lead for me to what I consider "Stagnation." That is what is what I did, I stagnated. I kept the level of knowledge that I had and went no further, I merely did the same things wrong as I was taught for 3 years because it was taught that way and the school must know what they were doing. About 2003 I landed the job of creating a web portal for my District's Youth Services (I was living in Berlin Germany at the time) and this needed to be accessible (I thought I knew what that meant back then) according to the German BITV laws. Well this was a big deal and trying to figure out how to do it with tables I came across two articles and a old Bookmarks file. The articles were from Gez Lemon (Juicey Studios) & Patrick "Redux" Lauke and both pointed to a web site named Accessif.com and it's Forum. The Bookmarks were mine and I discovered a site called Killersites that I had been to a few times based on the book of a big name designer. Killersites Well Killersites had changed, a new fellow was running in named Stefan and it now had a forum. So I joined it and quickly was linked further to a web site named CSSZenGarden - my Jaw hit the floor! CSS can do that? I still do not know if my school was so bad or at that time CSS support was just so poor, but it opened a new world to me and I jumped in feet first. Stef and David Mead were a great help in those early days. David has since dropped off Killersites due to spending time with his fairly new child but stops by once in a while. Accessibility did not exist on KS, but as I became more proficient I brought it up more and more and Stef supported me and was open minded to changing his ideas of web design and I finally became a moderator here ...ok, the fact I was in Germany and online when he was offline likely helped to *grin*. not only did I learn allothere about web design but having to then find ways to describe these new ideas to other regulars and new members helped me focus and consider options for arguments and teaching web design and accessibility here taught me as much as anything. Now I find members such as Im, Tpatterson, Thelma, Billy and many more who came here with either no experience or limited experience with accessibility and such now answering the same questions they used to ask and many more pointing out accessibility issues and the likes. I see my answerers online before I even have a chance. This is not because I am a super designer or teacher, it is because these people were open to new ideas and counter points to what the believed when they came here. They have reached the point they are now at, being respected by newbies they help because they were willing to listen to some unknown guy named LSW with just as much or maybe less years in the business as they themselves had. But in the end, they are now where they are because they got involved in a forum where they had contact with Stef, David, myself and each other.Because they had a place they enjoyed where new ideas and old myths were discussed among experts and beginners and all as equals. It is Forums that brought us where we are today. Accessify I walked into Accessify Forum thinking I knew what I was talking about ... whoa was I wrong. I did not know beans about accessibility in the real world. That was quickly pointed out to me and once I toned down my postings and began asking more, those in the group accepted me and I have learned from some of the best in the business including but not limited to Joe Clark , Patrick "Redux" Lauke, Isofarrow, Malarkey, Tommy "Toolman" Olsson, Brother Cake, Gez Lemon, Diva, Nigel Peck, Molly Holzschlag, ... also contact with people who work with and/or represent the W3C, RNIB and many others like Universities. The vast majority being from Europe and giving me another way of looking at the web. I even today read more than I answer as people there are far above me in the learning curve. This time I started and remained a beginner in may ways and as a user and not admin or moderator can say that it is also invaluable as a resource, Many of the best links I share at Killersites come from threads at Accessify. Although it like every other forum is about learning, it tends to be more discussion oriented with points and counter points as accessibility is not a s clear cut as HTML and CSS. It is harder to answer with yes and no answers as at KS. So their is more discussion about peoples views and understandings of guidelines and real life real time discussions about what works and what does not. The best blogs out there post here quite often before going live to get feedback from other big names. Accessify Forum put me in contact with the Guild of Accessible Web Designers (GAWDS) who's membership I joined and discovered (members web sites are first examined to ensure that they truly understand or support accessibility) that my "Accessible web site" had more barriers then you could shake a stick at and that I did not know the first thing about accessibility. But Mel Pedley of Blackwidow Designs not only pointed out my failings but how to fix them and with her help the LSW of that time became accessible and I was accepted as a member. I still find myself slapping my forehead over there when I discover some accessibility consideration so logical I should have seen it myself ...so I am still learning today. As above, the acceptance of the regulars and in this case industry leaders and their patience mean that once again a Forum opened up new worlds for me and "brainstorming with the best" has boosted my knowledge in these last 3 years far beyond the first year and I have learned more then I ever did in school. Other forums There are other forums out there, each with a specialty, SitePoint is a great general forum with more knowledge in the direction of programming and business oriented things. Computer Arts Forum gets more into the artistic and software oriented with allot of 3D, Flash and artistic subjects. I just dropped out of actively going to these forums as they are very big and somewhat hard to deal with as well as the move, real life and more duties at killersites. It does not reflect on their usefulness, simply on lack of time to spend there. It does not matter what forum you join, the point is that forums are a must for web designers just to keep your creativity charged and keep you up to date on recent changes in the industry. Whether you are a beginner or advanced, learning or teaching does not matter, it is the participation that matters that keeps you at your best for your customers and helper or "helpee" you will find your self learning and improving either way. Projects Although not directly related to forums, face it, you can read tutorials, blogs, books or forums and it does no good if you cannot turn around and put it in use now or later. Bookmarks are a must! Bookmark everything! And do so logically and under different labels so you can find it again when you need it! So projects are a must, private or customer, actual or make believe ... you need projects to support you in the forums. Like I say above, my knowledge has multiplied beyond belief since joining KS and accessify. Here I made the jump in a short amount of time between beginner and now the expert here for accessibility. All because I had projects that challenged me and required things I have never done before. But since my contract with the portal ended I have had no real challenges and although I spend allot oftime at KS some may have noticed that I am not so vocal, I help less then before, I basically chase Spam. It has become somewhat boring as the challenge is gone, I learn little new and we have a flock of regulars now faster with the same answers then me. I find myself once more in a slump, once more stagnating. I am now finishing up on a re-code of my Host's site, it was harder than expected but the only real challenge was working with Data Tables. But again i turned to the forums to get help, advice and see what I have missed never having done serious data tables before and for a short time it was fun again. So i will likely write another post on the correct creation of accessible data tables. So that is my rant, maybe self centered but I enjoy seeing Thelma and Susie now helping others as David and Stef likely feel about me having seen me improve here. It is easy to get caught up in the web and forget your real life, I see that every time my daughter wants to play and I say no. But just burying yourself in projects or real life can be the death of a designer as well. If it is even just one, choose a forum you like and hit it regularly, at least once a week for a few hours just to help and see what is changing as it is changing to keep from stagnating. If you have no time for forums then try at least a news mail list or a few important blogs, preferably allowing comments. Stagnation is death in this field.
  25. 1 point
    The following points were written originally to pull my thoughts together for a accessibility briefing on the status of web sites belonging to the state of Alaska, I thought I would add them here for you to read as well. As usual they are mirrored under LSW: Notes on the alt attribute -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The issue here is as follows: Alt stands for Alternative text. This means a text alternative to the information held or represented by an image. The popular misconception is that you need describe the image or say what the image is. This is not quite the point. The text is meant as an alternative to inform the user of any info they may be missing. If the image has no informative value it need not have alt text. The alt attribute however is required on every image. If there is no information to be shared, it may be left blank, alt="". If an image has information like a "Pie chart" you would wish to offer the same info as an alt attribute. You would textually show the same info, you can decide if the fact that the image is a pie chart is of importance or not. If not, then simply add the % shown. alt="Jueau: Rainfall 70%, Cloudy 20%, Sunshine 10%". You would not describe the image as in alt="3D pie chart using the colors red, yellow and green. Green being sunny days, red rain and yellow cloudy..." Do not use alt text for decorative images. Common is alt="bottom right corner". Although correct, this has no informative value as it pertains only to the look of the site for visual users. In these cases having a screen reader notify the user during the flow of the information that it has reached an image representing the bottom right corner is of no importance and adds to the general "noise." By leaving the alt in place but empty, the screen reader will skip the image and the user will either not know an image is present or will understand that the image is of no real value and they are missing nothing. By default, the screen reader will read the name of the image if an alt text is not available. The user would hear "image snodgrass-sen-center.jpg." This of course has no value to them. By adding the alt attribute it will either ignore the image or read the alt text given. For the above image a correct alt attribute would be to describe the information in the image... not the image itself. In this case alt="Commissioner Snuffy Smith and Director Gomer Pile visit with seniors at the Snodgrass Senior Center on Wednesday, May 23, 2007.", no description of the surroundings or even in what position the officials are standing in is given as it is of no value for the visually impaired. Again the same image, if the image does however have a caption, in this case you would not want a caption and an alt text as this would result in the screen reader reading both and the information is doubled. You do not want the alt alone as the visual user will not have access to it. However the caption, due to it's positioning would be clear enough to a screen reader user that the two belong together. So in the case of captions, as there are no HTML elements to deal with captions, it is justified to leave the alt attribute blank as the caption text already describes the information of the image and you would leave the left and right specifications in place for the visual users to identify which person fits which name and title. So in closing, it is imperative that all images regardless are given a alt attribute, alt text should only be used if the image portraits important information. If the image is purely decorative the alt attribute is left empty and in the case of images with captions the alt attribute should be left empty. In her article "Reviving Anorexic Web Writing" Amber Simmons makes a very good point about how alt text can make even decorative images more interesting and give an emotional alternative meaning to the vision impaired. The "longdesc" is the big brother of the alt attribute. It stands for "Long description." The specs do not limit the length of the alt attribute. Usually the alt attribute is kept fairly short. Longdesc in unlimited, rule of thumb is that it would be more sentences. The issue here is the opinion of many in the community that if an image is of such importance and complexity to need a long description, then the content deserves a page itself or a description directly in the content of the original page with the image as a visual aid to the textual information. For years longdesc was not widely supported by user agents, I have heard comments suggesting it is still not well supported and from others that it is widely supported now. The longdesc is added as an attribute with the alt attribute and links to a separate file with the description. I discovered a interesting use for the "Longdesc" attribute in the Section508.gov FAQ : [Edited May 2008]
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