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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/17/2017 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Greetings, everyone! I've never interacted with the community surrounding Stefan's work, but when I heard a new forum had been developed I thought it would be a great time to get involved! A little bit about myself: My name is Logan. I'm a 24 year old from Hot Springs, Arkansas; a small town in the southern region of the US. Right now I'm working in marketing and sales for local business, but I'm obsessed with business and innovation. Creating real value for people is what gets me out of bed every morning! Although I've taken some of Stef's courses and self-learned a bit of programming, I am no authority on the subject. I feel like I know just enough to understand how everything works. However, I find topics of modern tech implementation pretty exciting and I look forward to listening what everyone has to share. If I'm not a programming wiz, what the heck and I doing here? I'm not sure yet! Haha. I'd like to see how the forum evolves as the community grows. It would be fun to riff about business, finance, or anything else that may spark an interest. I think this will be a neat place to learn and share information! Chao!
  2. 2 points
    I have not looked at Studio Web for Python... but yea, Stef does good work. I checked it out when he first started it. Besides all languages are common, so knowing one will help learning others as you see the common elements.
  3. 2 points
    Just super backedup with work ... activating schools. Going to circle around to add more to the Business Battle Plan by next week. I plan on outputting all the mp3 files as well. Stef
  4. 2 points
    Hi! Here is your roadmap to Wordpress freelance work: Do the StudioWeb core language training: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, SQL Do the Wordpress Themes course in the projects Do the CRUDE project course as well Start learning the Wordpress ecosystem ... know what the options are for the top themes, plugins, e-commerce options. My Business Battleplan course will help with the freelance/business end of things. You will be good to go. I assume you know the basics of Wordpress. Stef
  5. 2 points
    Working on my entrepreneurs course. It looks like it's going to be a great course!
  6. 2 points
    One of the frustrations with learning programming is that you absolutely have to be in front of the computer. Audio is a great way to learn while driving, walking/running, doing the dishes etc. Really frees up the slots of time which you can use to keep learning!
  7. 2 points
    Hi, So I have yet to apply a skin and tweak the settings. But, the new software is in place.
  8. 1 point
    Web Developers, much of my posting to date has covered protecting yourself. Lets talk about protecting your customer and their users. I cannot state this any stronger, Strong Passwords! If it takes little effort to break a password than the site you built can be hi-jacked to pass out malware. Database design, consider making it a tiered design. Sensitive data in a red zone, encrypted and password protected with strict access permissions. Less sensitive data in a Yellow zone that has lesser protection and more access and simple stuff in a green zone with just password protection and general permissions. If you use look-up tables that state that "2 = married with children", that is a look-up table and needs liuttle protection. But all sensitive data should be encrypted so that if adversaries do get to it... they can't read it. Be aware of SQL Injection attacks. If you allow data to be added to a website, make sure it is checked. If you allow basic comments with no security, an adversary could insert JavaScript into that comment that does really bad things. Malware Detection - Discovering Cross-Site Scripting Attacks Watering Hole Attacks. I think LastLine blog defined it rather well: "In a network watering hole attack, cybercriminals set traps in websites that their target victims are known to frequent. Often the booby-trapped websites are smaller, niche sites that tend to have limited security. These sites can include business partner sites or small websites that provide specific products, services, or information to the target company or industry. When visited, the compromised website infects the target end-users computer or device with keyloggers, ransomware, and other types of malware." The issue here is really about protecting web sites you build from being the water holes that infects your customers users. Network Security and Watering Hole Attacks As I come across tips for securing your web sites, I will expand this thread.
  9. 1 point
    Check out PhoneGap if you want to create an actual app. But more likely than not, just make the PHP page responsive and you should be fine for mobile. Stef
  10. 1 point
    I started Stef's KillerPython as a programming refresher and to clarify some things in Python. I like this tool Turtle that he chose to explain things. It's less complicated than other tutorials I've seen trying to use TKinter or even worse PyGame. In the attached code, I have functions for drawing a square or triangle making use of For Loops and If Then statements. The first argument controls the size of the shapes. I wanted a way to accept a second argument telling the Turtle to draw the shape to the left or the right, but I seemed to be getting into a weird situation trying to get Words or Strings accepted as arguments. I defined right = 1 and left = 2 so they sort of behaved like integers in my IF statement. Anyway, so far I'm enjoying the approach to KillerPython. As I said in a post on YouTube, I've had some coding classes that leaned heavily on Power Point and were so awfully boring lol. This is much better feeling more casual and interactive. Testing.py
  11. 1 point
    ofc makes sence well this could become a pretty good hobby might need some help in some cases but thats why forums exist hehe
  12. 1 point
    Just keep going. Do the quizzing and write code. It will stick with you more and more as you go. Stef
  13. 1 point
    Hi everyone, I'm Mike. I tried to post a reply yesterday, but I kept getting an error saying that I was forbidden to post. Anyway, I'm a retired electronic/telecommunications technician, who has always, as Stef would put it so aptly, a need to nerd. I got into programming before computers were even out, around 1978/1979. Someone offered to sell me a programmable calculator, a TI-56. I had no idea, at the time what a programmable calculator was, but, once I caught onto it. My first computer was a VIC-20, and, I programmed that, saving my programs to audio tape. I got away from electronics for a few years, until my last job sent me a Raspberry Pi to upgrade a Bose audio unit. I started reading up on the Raspberry Pi and it got me interested in electronics/programming once again. And, Stef's videos have inspired me to put more effort into reading up on programming and coding. For the last four weeks, I've spent at least four hours a day either reading or coding. I'm well into Stef's HTML 2015 course. Once I've completed my Linux material, my C++ material and my GTK+ coding, I'll have more time to complete Stef's course. Stef, I know you like to close out your videos saying, "I hope this helps." Believe me, anyone who shares as much as you have helps everyone. Good work. -Mike
  14. 1 point
    A few things will cause your site to not appear in the search engines. First thing is to be sure this line of code IS NOT in your pages: <meta name="robots" content="noindex,nofollow"> ... The above code tells the search engines to ignore your page and any links in the page. Instead, use this code: <meta name="robots" content="all"> You can learn more here: https://developers.google.com/search/reference/robots_meta_tag Check out this screenshot for details:
  15. 1 point
    Do you mean the CSS width property? Check out my CSS course where I get into CSS layout, I go into detail how the horizontal space an element takes is affected by margins, padding and borders. That said, with CSS Grid and flexbox, this becomes a non issue but for older browsers, you still need to understand this. Makes sense?
  16. 1 point
    Sorry for the long delay. I get soooo many questions. For me, being about to develop apps was a valuable skill that just gave me more options. I look at coding as one of many: Writing Coding Communication Etc .... How to motivate yourself: Start learning ... say for example, do 20 minutes / day. StudioWeb will be ideal for you, since you can just do 2 video lessons a day, and their questions. This is all tracked and so you never have to figure out where you were. Continue to do you daily training .... like doing a daily exercise. It's only 20 minutes ... and you don't need to shower after! Start looking around for ideas on things you might build. Ask some business owners you know what kind of software they may need, or maybe a small business may need a website. Get a feel for what is out there. Hope that helps! Stef
  17. 1 point
    Hi, The Python is a separate purchase, you have to admit, at only $29, they are a bargain! https://www.killervideostore.com/video-courses/beginners_python_3.php I believe the Python course is the best I've created. Stef
  18. 1 point
    I get it now! Thanks Stef! :))
  19. 1 point
    Oh, that's fantastic! It's working better now. That is basically what I was doing but had it in the wrong place and a slightly different hook. Thanks so much. I just need to work with the styling. Thanks so much
  20. 1 point
    Ok --- testing worked, I tried to thank Anadar for the excellent recommendation, and it somehow caused a disturbance in the force..... got
  21. 1 point
    Hi there This is a question I just posted on Stefan's Youtube site and seeing as I and have just joined the forum I thought it would be a good idea to post it here too: Your web design course is the best I've tried by far. I am still working through the front-end parts but looming large are the back-end parts to the course. With this in mind, I have a question that you have touched upon in earlier Youtube videos but since the developer world moves so fast maybe it is worth asking this (again) in late 2017. The big choice to make for starting developers is the server language and it seems that at the end of 2017 there are 3 big players: 1. PHP 2. Javascript(nodeJS) and 3. Python(Django). Picking between these is really difficult because: 1. PHP was and still is the most popular (70% of small/medium websites) and it has Wordpress tied up. It is also on your course so I feel like I will fully understand it BUT most if not all bootcamps seem to be pushing nodeJS and a lot of Vloggers, other than yourself suggest that full-stack will eventually move entirely to javascript. Do you think this is true? And if so how soon will nodeJS start to dominate? 2. Learning nodeJs means that a new developer only has to learn one language and therefore it seems a win-win. So are there any issues/problems about this that a new developer should be aware of? 3. Python is everywhere: web development , AI, machine learning, internet of things, kids programming etc. So even though it is a less popular back-end language than PHP and maybe nodeJS, learning it seems like a good investment. What is the future of Python on the web? I would love to hear anyones thoughts on this. (Just realised this should probably be in the web development section - sorry!) Joe Show less REPLY
  22. 1 point
    Hi, Just send me a personal message or email me, I will send you credentials to the StudioWeb Python course. Stef
  23. 1 point
    Thanks for the letting me know. Glad to hear my courses are helping! Stef
  24. 1 point
    Thank you for your help. I tried to down it again, and it worked.
  25. 1 point
    I know to code in PHP and JS but I am feeling that I dont know that really good, that I have missed some stuff and I want to review it. I tried JS on my own (with books) didnt work out. Tried one course, taught me just a partially JS, but still I valued that knowlege that I learned from that. Then I said I want to go to school where they teach you Web Programming in a year, because I want someone to teach me. Its a good thing, but still didnt feel I learned all, I think they use lots of terminology words and its not that simplified and I am kinda a guy who likes to learn step by step. Then out of nowhere on YouTube I find you, and thats how all started. I like the way lectures are made and they are simple to understand. Also like the way of teaching. You teach like I would do (when you were talking about what HTML is I said in myself "If I ever teach someone to code I would tell them that HTML is like bricks on the house" and then you say the same I know we are sharing the same name but we got lot of similarities, maybe you are my long lost brother haha ) With your teachings I finally put the puzzles I was missing in their place. I mean I've learned web foundation, and many more things from you where others didnt taught me, and that help me realize so much in coding. I just finished JS functions, and even I learned that before, I feel that I know more than before and that my knowledge of JS is better. And of course better understanding of programming and all. I am simply telling you all of this just you to know that you are a great teacher. Thats why I asked in what order should I learn your courses because in PHP course you said that you wont have to say what functions are cuz you explained them in JS course, and I want to hear your explanation for that (I know, little weird, but I want to master the basics, after that everything else is easier). Stefan P.S.(I have enormous urge to select answers like "Dogs wrote HTML" , "Stef is trying to mess us again" , "Fries are good for you", dont know why )
  26. 1 point
    Here is a Good look at why non-US killersites members should be paying attention. This reviews Net-Neutrality from a Canadian view, not the US vote of the FCC, but in general, the whole general subject faced by Canadians. Threat To Net Neutrality Hits Canada In a New Form
  27. 1 point
  28. 1 point
    Stefan is having a coffee with Stefan? Wow, this is some CoffeeStefption
  29. 1 point
    Ok you all know about " " or ' '. You may use them often. But are you using them right? First let us look at the different forms of using Quotes: Quoting a person's comments - "LSW is the greatest web designer of all time". You agenerally write this with an accreditation. Stef said "LSW is the greatest web designer of all time". Now we know how Stef feels *grin*. Sarcasm or highlighting - Now let us move the quotes, LSW is the "greatest" web designer of all time. Now one can say that you are saying I am the greatest, but highlighting the Greatest to suggest that you do not feel this way or using sarcasm. Stef said "LSW is the 'greatest' web designer of all time", now you can easily see Sref?s look of contempt as he says it. Or it can in other sentences mean that the word is special. Stef said "LSW is the greatest 'accessible' web designer of all time", in this case it is not sarcasm, here you can say Stef thinks I am not the best designer of all time, but I am the best accessibility designer of all time. Also highlighting in a form of separating text from the surroundings. But that is the easy part. now let us look at the web specifically. Miss use One of the most misused tags on the net is . Time and time again I see it used by people instead of paragraphs because they like the default style of blockquotes. But Blockquote has a meaning and you are confusing people possibly when you misuse it for formatting, that is what CSS is for. So when do you use them? - is a inline element really meant for being used inside paragraphs and sentences. - is a block level element, a stand alone block of text and must include block-level elements such as headings, lists, paragraphs or divas. - now this is tricky as few agree. Some think it should not be used. Some claim it is replacing and better than while still others say it is for use when you are for instance not quoting something spoken, but more like if you were to cite a section of a book or something of that nature. When you use these tags people expect a text from a third person or source and reference to who said/printed it. By simply using it to format text visually you can confuse non visual users when the software interacts with that text in a different way. Credit You can give credit in different forms like "Stef said...", "in a article at Killersites.com....". However HTML gives us another form. It is the cite attribute.
  30. 1 point
    Wasn't too sure which forum to post this in, so I'll just drop this here. Some of you might think this silly, and maybe it is, but I find it useful. So maybe someone here will too. Backstory / Thought Process Behind The Idea In the real world we typically have different environments (rooms, or areas of rooms) for doing different things. An office, living room, dining room, kitchen, study, workshop, etc. I like this idea. Different spaces for different purposes. There's something about going into your workshop, or your office, and you know it's time to do that certain thing that you do in that room. The brain/body instantly just goes into the right mode without too much effort. Same thing with plunking yourself down on the sofa in the living room for some netflix. Time to chill. Or like that place that you usually take an afternoon nap. It's just easier to nap there because you're conditioned to relax and fall asleep in that spot. It would be cool to have something like that on the level of an operating system. Different digital environments that we could quickly open up (walk into the room), or fold away (leave and head to a different room). And without having to close everything down, put files away, close programs, or lose our place in the workflow every time we switched into a different mode/activity. There are 2 main benefits to this whole idea: Effortlessly being in the right mode for doing whatever you're doing, because you're mind/body are conditioned to the environment. Not having to put away, then re-setup everything every time you switch modes or activities The technology is not quite there on the OS front. (at least not that I'm aware of) In the mean time, we can do something along these lines by using "Web Browser Apps". Especially since so much of the stuff we do is online and in the cloud now. Web Browser Apps What's a web browser app? It's basically just my term for a seperate browser environment that you create for a specific use/purpose. It could be a task, project, type of work, or activity that you reguarly do. Chrome & Firefox both give you the ability to create multiple browser profiles. Each with their own bookmarks, plugins, cookies, program configurations, etc. Each profile is essentially its own completely seperate app. Example 1: I have a specific browser profile for my finances & banking. When I open it up, everything is already open and ready to go. I don't have to click any bookmarks or open any websites. All of the main sites that I use to do anything finance & banking related are open and ready to go instantly, with 1 click. My personal banking, business banking, paypal, credit card, freshbooks, financial tracking, book keeping. Everything is ready to go. Anything else is quickly accessible with 1 click from a not-too-over-crowded bookmarks bar. *security note: do not save your passwords in your browser if you do this with your finances and banking I use a local encrypted password database that is read by the browser. I unlock it with a single master pasword. Then as soon as my computer goes to sleep everything locks up, until I unlock it again the next day. Very handy. Example 2: I have a specific browser instance that I use only for casual browsing & entertainment. It's like being on my digital couch in my digital living room. It has all the right entertainment related bookmarks quickly accessible in the bookmarks bar, and the browser is configured just right for the purpose. Example 3: I have a specific browser profile that I use just for web development purposes. It has all the addons/extensions, bookmarks to different online tools quickly accessible, specific keyboard shortcuts etc. And no fluff/junk in the way. This approach also helps to keep me focused when I'm working. If the Browsing & Entertainment profile isn't open, then I'm not distracted and I'm effortlessly in focused work mode. Conversely if I open that browser, then I'm very aware that I'm nolonger focused and in work mode! I like to keep things clean and clearly separated like this. I find it useful. I also have separate browser environments for: Email & Communication Project Management Learning & Education Project Specific Profiles and quite a few more. Anyone else doing something like this? Or am I just a weird nerd? Either way, hope someone out there might find this useful. Cheers All. Tyler.
  31. 1 point
    Web Designer is rather just the default standardized accepted term. Personally I always preferred "Web Developer". Web Designer was traditionally a matter of "Look & Feel" and structure. Put these days, and back 10 years, it began including some programming, now more programming, Content Management systems, multi-platform, sometimes Logos and branding, administration, even data base work in some cases. Lastly, my two soapbox areas, web accessibility and cyber security. We owe it to our customers to ensure all their customers and their own data etc. is both safe from attack and accessible to those with any number of disabilities. Web design was back when a designer designed a web site and passed it to a coder to "Make it so Number One". But for freelancers and now most big organizations that is not the case, the name just hung around like Internet Explorer. Web Developer is a better term I think, we are developing it from scratch.
  32. 1 point
    Hello Stef, I'm actually in your web design class. My plan is to push through the course as quickly as I can and help redesign the site. The issue is because I'm such a novice. I don't know the best approach to take. Do you have any suggestions or plan of attack once I obtain these skills? P.S. How long do I need to wait before I can post links on the forum? lol jk
  33. 1 point
    I just have a few grammar suggestions: Web Development: Since From a young age, I have .... Skills: I have knowledge in responsive web design with experience in: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, Bootsrap, Node.js, Python, AJAX, Angular, Visual Basic and am learning more every day! (or ..., Visual Basic, and I am learning more every day!) As to Athletics and Hobbies - Is the site about you, or is is there to get you web development work? If it's you - then fine, but if it's there to get you work, I don't see how any of that is relevant at all. If I'm looking for a plumber, I want one who does good work, and I couldn't care less if in his spare time, he's bird-watching or under-water-basket weaving. And from the 'Need a Website?" part: If you need a website that looks great on all screen sizes, you've you have come to the right place. I work with a small team of developers, and we would love to get you started. We aim to make the process as easy for you as possible, leaving the work to us while keeping you posted every step of the way. We aim to make the process as easy for you as possible. Leave the work to us, and we will keep you posted every step of the way. Our goal is to make your dream site come to life, and we wont will not stop until you agree! Get in touch with me (see below), and we can discuss the details. None of this is a big deal, and most people probably won't notice, but grammar nazis like I am, will :-)
  34. 1 point
    We get a lot of questions about learning, but part of getting a job is also experience. Volunteering is not just a way to get experience but also built up a body of work and employers do tend to like people who volunteer. So how can I get experience? What are you thinking with volunteering? 1. Teaching: This will depend on your experience and area. In Germany I helped Youth Club staff build good web sites. Here in Juneau I did a seminar for local businesses. Here at Killersites I have learned things or made “mental connections” as I have tried to teach or help many of you with your issues. Often when helping others you realize other ways of doing things that you never considered before, you learn things answering other’s questions. Maybe teach a local high school computer club good web design. 2. Free web work: Like many others I did web work for some non-profit sites. I did the work for free, so they got a cheap web site and I had a web site to show besides my own and a professional reference for my application. Look around at charities, churches, and other non-profit entities online or your area. 3. Volunteering: Naturally any place you volunteer will aid you. I will stick with IT work here though. Even if it is not web design, you have more computer experience than most average folks to you can be of great help just doing basic IT stuff. You will also learn new skills and experience other IT areas you like more. I started in web design, then went to programming and am now my divisions cyber security person. So, do not fear volunteering for “other” IT work. A. Red Cross/Crescent – The Red Cross works differently is different countries, so I can only speak to the American Red Cross (ARC), but my guess is that the Canadian Red Cross, Deutsches Rotes Kreuz e.V., etc. will have the same needs, just other terms. i. Disaster Services Technology (DST): The ARC is going digital more each year, many of the tools they use are online. Every time ARC volunteers deploy to a disaster, some of the first ones in are DST, and there are never enough DST volunteers. So, as long as volunteers are in the field at disasters, so are their technical support. Computers: There is a sub-team that handles passing out, setting up, managing and maintaining and collecting computers. Also support for the apps used. Networking: A sub-team that specifically deals with networking, connectivity, and Servers. Big disasters like this fall will have field servers deployed, many communications may be down, so we set up satellite internet connections. We use wired and WiFi connections, routers, switches and set up printers. Communications: This sub-team passes out and supports smart phones, tablets, handheld and mobile radios, radio base stations, antennas etc. Customer support: This is basically the help desk folks who help the users. [NOTE: these are the four official jobs in DST, but the disaster decides the actual build. You may find yourself doing multiple jobs if the disaster is not as big or there are not enough volunteers. DST from hurricane Harvey is still in the field from all over the country, and it is usually a two week deployment, so they constantly need people, so there may not be enough. I am the only DST member for all of SE Alaska] ii. IT End User Services (IT EUS) – Another ARC group to consider for those times between disasters. This is really just the IT shop for the ARC broken into regions. I am currently going through the process. As an EUS volunteer I will be dealing with maintenance and troubleshooting of ARC computers in my area, helping other volunteer and staff with their computer problems, running updates etc. Again, I am the only EUS person for SE Alaska, the nearest are almost 6 miles away in Anchorage. iii. There are many other volunteer jobs for logistics, shelter workers etc. with any of the Red Cross/Crescents as well both day to day and disaster situations. B. CyberPatriot – CyberPatriot is a national youth cyber education program run each year by the Air Force Association (AFA) and partners. The AFA sees the lack of cyber security trained people on the US workforce to be a National Security Issue. They want to get more youth interested in STEM and computer jobs and increase the number of women in the IT sector. You can volunteer as an assistant coach for teams in your area, or you can contact schools or organizations in the area to coach your own teams. This competition is not just for the geeks, it is built for people, teens or coaches with no idea about computers and or cyber security to be able to comete as the whole idea is to get kids not interested in computers to reconsider. It is a two-part program. i. The education part entails teaching youth to use the internet in a safe manner. They support schools or others running cyber safety summer camps and such activities. ii. Part two is the CyberPatriot Cyber Defense Competition where teams from across the US (I think Canada too) made up of teenagers, compete nationally for the best score finding vulnerabilities and securing a server system. Teams can be from schools, military organizations like JROTC or Civil Air Patrol Cadets for instance and other groups like boy scouts. They are even pushing for all-female teams. C. Civil Air Patrol – Quite wide spread down south, CAP is a civilian corporation owned by the US Air Force. Its task is the primary Search & Rescue agency in the US. Primarily for missing aircraft, but also hikers, boaters, etc. They are all volunteers and always need pilots, air crews, ground search personnel and those to run the search. Among other squadron jobs, there is an official job for IT personnel. So, check your local CAP squadrons, volunteer and maybe be their IT shop or if they have Cadets, offer to coach a Cadet CyberPatriot team. D. National Collegiate Cyber Defense Championship – I have not dealt with this group, but it is a college version of CyberPatriot more or less, just for college students. If you live in a college town this may be another possible point to help out. This is just a partial list based on what I generally have had experience with. Anyone else have suggestions, even from their own countries, go ahead and add it. Just remember that when you volunteer you help your community and yourself. You can gain much broader experience that can only help you get jobs or pad your university application. Getting into cyber type stuff will give you a deeper grasp of computers and servers and help ensure your future web design customers have secure web sites.
  35. 1 point
    Hello perryc, If you're still alive since you posted your last question on this forum (just kidding...), in order to get your absolutely positioned image to scale the way you want, you have to do two things : 1) Be sure to wrap your absolutely positioned image(s) in a relatively positioned container. 2) Set the desired width for each of the images you want to scale in a relative unit (like in percentage for exemple), and not in a fixed unit (like in pixels for exemple). It is not enough to set a max-width equal to 100% for all your images, because the "width" value applied to each of your images will take precedence over the general "max-width" value. In other words, width and max-width are two different properties. 3) Don't forget to add a min-height to your container if you ONLY have HTML elements that are positioned abolutely inside of it, otherwise this container will no longer be aware of their existence. (When you position an element absolutely, you completely remove it from the natural flow of the page.) So, to summarize, here is an example where I put two images (with "position: absolute") inside of an overall container (with "position: relative"). The first image appears in the top left hand corner of the container ; the second image, in the bottom right hand corner. If you try this setting, you'll see that both images scale perfectly, even with "position: absolute" applied to them. <div class="container"> <img class="absolute first" src="my_bogus_image1.jpg"> <img class="absolute second" src="my_bogus_image2.jpg"> </div><!-- end of container --> img { max-width: 100%; height: auto; } .container { position: relative; width: 90%; /* Whatever width you want it to be. */ min-height: 850px; /* In case you ONLY have ABSOLUTELY positioned html elements (like images) inside of your container, you must set a min-width sufficient to contain all your images. */ } .absolute { position: absolute; /* Use the top, left, right and/or bottom properties as usual to position the image in relation to the container div */ } .first { top: 0; left: 0; width: 20%; /* Whatever width you want, but expressed in a relative unit. */ } .second { bottom: 0; right: 0; width: 30%; /* Whatever width you want, but expressed in a relative unit. */ }
  36. 1 point
    Sublime is great. I prefer it to notepad++ because it's easier to install extensions. A great extension is emmet - it gives you some really useful shortcuts like so: h1.main-text>ul.main-mav>li.nav*5 outputs this: <h1 class="main-text"> <ul class="main-mav"> <li class="nav"></li> <li class="nav"></li> <li class="nav"></li> <li class="nav"></li> <li class="nav"></li> </ul> </h1> If you dislike the default colour scheme, you can change it to the same as notepad++ in preferences.
  37. 1 point
    Do you think it's ok for a service provider to call himself an entrepreneur? I live in Chiang Mai where's there's an abundance of people who are working remotely. I've heard people refer to themselves and me as an entrepreneur. I usually tell them I'm not an entrepreneur yet, as I only provide 1 service. I think you can start calling yourself an entrepreneur when you provide several services across minimum 2 separate businesses. What do you think? Adam
  38. 1 point
    Yippee!!! That's it!!!! Stef, you're the best
  39. 1 point
    Thank you so much for this very detailed response. It'll take me a bit to figure out what I did 2 years ago, but I'll work through it and apply your suggestions.
  40. 1 point
    A couple of questions: 1) is "my-friends" an html file? Does it have an extension (.txt .html, etc)? If so, it must have that extension in the link. I am running under the assumption that is is another page in your site and is called "my-friends.html".Make sure it has an html extension. The names must match (file name and the name in your link) <p>Meet<a href="my-friends.html"> my friends.</a></p> 2) If this is a file, it must be in the same directory as your index.html (or whatever you call you home page). If not, you need to give a path to the file. It is customary to have the html files of a site in the root directory and other things in sub directories. <p>Meet<a href="directory/my-friends.html"> my friends.</a></p> If I am barking up the wrong tree, clarify what you mean by not loading correctly. Add a screen shot if you can.
  41. 1 point
  42. 1 point
    Nice. Keep us updated, looking forward to seeing what you come up with.
  43. 1 point
    jQuery Official Blog Hacked — Stay Calm, Library is Safe! https://thehackernews.com/2017/10/jquery-hacked.html
  44. 1 point
    Hey domdag, looking good man! Really nice work Here are some quick thoughts on my first impressions, more from a marketing angle than the dev/design side: *apologies in advance that I can't leave you more detailed feedback right this second! Your site gives off a great trust vibe. You look professional and the impression I get is that you have your $#it together and you're a competent individual. The track picture and clear association with your almamatar is a nice touch. It's effective! So all around, well done on the key piece of establishing trust. One thing I see lacking is copy that's more focused on your visitor. So far everything is about you, but consider adding some copy that directly addresses the ideal person you hope to influence with your portfolio. Who is your ideal client? What problems, challenges, or needs might they have that you can help them with? What is it like to work with you and what added value do you bring to the table? Why should they hire you? Answering those kind of questions can help you create strong copy that has the potential to connect with a potential client (assuming that's the purpose of your portfolio). Example: Even if you don't have all those answers figured out yet, you could say something like: "When working on a project with a developer, communication and reliability are key. A cornerstone to my approach is to map out a clear project plan with my client and communicate at every step of the way so that they always know where their project stands. I aim to give clients the peace of mind that comes from knowing their project is on schedule and everything is on track, so they can remain focused on their business." Remember. People are always asking themselves "What's in it for me?" (beyond the obvious of "I'll get an app/site developed"). Which is where benefits focused copy comes in. Fire up a google search on Benefits Focused Copy and an hour of reading should have you well on your way. Hope that helps man! Tyler.
  45. 1 point
    As Stef mentioned, you'll defintely want to get set up in webmaster tools / search console. Make sure you submit your site map and keep an eye on the crawl & index status for your site over the next week or so. You can also use an advanced search operator to see how many pages google currently has indexed, then manually flip through the results as needed: Head over to google and do a search for site:mywebsite.com ... ie: List of google advanced operators: Reference 1 from google & Reference 2 (more comprehensive) from a 3rd party site.
  46. 1 point
    Nice intro Logan. Sounds like we have a lot in common. I like your comment: "Creating real value for people is what gets me out of bed every morning!" I couldnt' agree more. It's pretty cool to have the skills and knowledge to help people grow their businesses and contribute to their success, especially when connected to local businesses and seeing the tangible effect it can have on peoples lives. Looking forward to seeing you around the forums! T.
  47. 1 point
    Hi, Ahh .. yes. The Python course in StudioWeb has quizzing ... so I mentioned the quizzing. Email directly if you want StudioWeb.com access with all the quizzing and gamification. How are you liking the python course so far? Thanks, Stefan
  48. 1 point
    I can understand the shared host reluctance ... proxy service might cause problems for them in terms of bandwidth. Your best option is a VPS like Digital Ocean where you can slowly scale up as you need to. The cost starts out very reasonable.
  49. 1 point
    That makes sense, you are populating: $responseBody ... with the filter string data. Stef
  50. 1 point
    Thank you. Excellent sounding advice.